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Tag archive: Potassium

Using deep soil cores for Nitrogen, Potassium & Sulfur

Soil testing is a valuable tool for crop nutrition decision making. The standard 0 – 10cm soil test doesn’t always tell us enough about the crop availability of more mobile nutrients. Nitrogen and Sulphur, as anions (negatively charged), tend to move deeper into the profile with rainfall. On sandy acid […]

Claying and crop nutrition

Claying by delving brings subsoil clays up to the surface. It’s a proven treatment for water repellency. Integrating clays into sandy topsoils also changes their nutrient status. What happens depends on the specific clay material involved. Testing of clay material prior to spreading or delving is very important to ensure […]

What nutrients are lost when making hay from failed crops?

Cutting for hay is an option to get some economic value from a failed crop. Growers with an eye to the long term productivity of their paddocks weigh the value of the hay against the value of leaving the crop material in the paddock. Nutrients that would otherwise be recycled […]

Crop nutrition in soils with added clay

David Hall from DAFWA says adding clays to sandy soils can add significant Potassium and Phosphorous, as well as improve the nutrient holding capacity of the soil.  Recorded at the National Soil Science conference at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, November 2014. Further information Proceedings of the Soil Science Australia National Soil […]

Be alert for signs of nutrient deficiencies

Now is a good time of year to look for unusual symptoms in your crops that could indicate possible nutrient deficiencies. As Mark Conyers’ says, “Sometimes the best fertiliser is the shadow of the farmer”, so keep your eyes open while going around your crops. Things like poor growth or […]

Potassium an essential nutrient

  It was suggested in a recent paper from the US that because 24% of reports from a literature survey showed positive responses to applied K, that growers did not need to use K fertilizers. While K responses will not occur on all soils with all crops, there are clearly […]